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  12 Oct 2017         Posté par ana

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Studio Photoshoots > 2017 > Session 015 for Who What Wear

WHO: Ana de Armas

WHAT: Ana is hardly a new face in the film industry, but her upcoming role as Joi in Blade Runner 2049 puts her on a whole new playing field. While details about her character have remained under wraps, we know she plays the romantic opposite to Ryan Gosling’s K. Some may call that lucky (honestly, hard to refute that), but Ana’s new stardom and prestige reflect years of hard work—over 10—for the Cuban actress whose résumé is impressive…and growing.

What excited me most about playing the role of Joi is… “that she, as a woman, is expected to be and act in a certain way, and she was more than that.”

Surprisingly, the one thing I do have in common with Joi is that… “I would sacrifice anything for love.”

To prepare to take on such a major role in a film as highly anticipated as this one, I… “had a lot of conversations with [director] Denis Villeneuve and a lot of sharing of ideas. Of course, the first Blade Runner was a big inspiration for all of us … but we are creating our own movie now with a very different director and new characters, so it was long talks with Denis and going through the scenes with him and Ryan and knowing at what point emotionally these characters are at.”

Unless you were on the set of Blade Runner 2049, you might not know that… “our still photographer, Steve, was the same still photographer for the first film. So in between takes, I used to hang with him, and he would tell me stories about the actors and how it was working with Ridley [Scott].”

The best lesson I’ve ever learned from a costume designer or stylist is… “sometimes you have to take risks. I’ve always thought that fashion is something to help show who you are and to reinforce your personality. It can be a strength. So it’s important that when you have a stylist they get to really know you and you feel comfortable in what you are wearing. But you should also listen and try new things. I’m working on that.”

What I love most about style in my home country of Cuba is… “there wasn’t really a sense of fashion in Cuba. Now it’s different: People have more access to Instagram or magazines. When I was growing up, none of that was going on. It was pretty hippy, artisanal, and kind of freeing that you didn’t really have to think too much about. I always recycled my brother’s clothes. I wore boy stuff mixed with hippy skirts and always flip-flops. Always.”

The three fall pieces that are currently sitting in my shopping cart are… “I’d love one of those Stella McCartney masculine wool coats in dark blue. It has that tomboyish vibe–I love it!

“I would like some really badass leather pants, like with zippers and things here at the knees.

“I would love one of those little Chloé bags.”

source

  06 Oct 2017         Posté par ana

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Studio Photoshoots > 2017 > Session 013 for Hollywood Reporter

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Screencaps > Photoshoots Clips > 2017, October for Hollywood Reporter

The Cuban actress first auditioned for the role of Joi, Ryan Gosling’s love interest, by reading a scene from the 2014 sci-fi flick ‘Ex Machina’ — and is still cagey on details of the character: “She is anything you want her to be.”

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  02 Oct 2017         Posté par ana

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Screencaps > Photoshoots Clips > 2017, October for Flaunt

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Studio Photoshoots > 2017 > Session 011 for Flaunt

 

 

Where do I come from?

“I come from an island called Cuba,” de Armas tells me as we sit inside Forge studios while a crew of stylists, photographers, and agents scramble around us trying to decide on her first “look” of the day. She left the comforts of Havana in 2014, not in pursuit of making more money or a chance at a “better life,” she says—she traveled to Los Angeles to grow as an artist. “Leaving my career and my life there was a huge risk, but I’ve never been intimidated by risk. It excites me,” she tells me. She knew at a young age that she wanted to pursue acting, enrolling in the National Theatre School of Cuba in Havana when she was only 14 years old. “The four years I studied in drama school were incredibly important in my formation as an actress. They were critical in showing me what discipline is in this profession, what hard work acting really is. It’s nothing fancy, and it’s not easy at all.” For more over the source:


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